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The Resource A treasury of great American speeches : our country's life and history in the words of its great men, With illus. from various historical periods

A treasury of great American speeches : our country's life and history in the words of its great men, With illus. from various historical periods

Label
A treasury of great American speeches : our country's life and history in the words of its great men
Title
A treasury of great American speeches
Title remainder
our country's life and history in the words of its great men
Statement of responsibility
With illus. from various historical periods
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"The great speeches reported in the style of today's newspapers with descriptions of the circumstances, surroundings and significance of each when it was delivered and the sequels and repercussions which made history from 1645 to 1960."
Cataloging source
DLC
Dewey number
815.082
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
LC call number
PS662
LC item number
.H8
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1903-1968
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Hurd, Charles
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Speeches, addresses, etc., American
  • United States
Label
A treasury of great American speeches : our country's life and history in the words of its great men, With illus. from various historical periods
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Liberty is the proper end and object of authority / John Winthrop (1645) -- That the Lord may behold us as a people, offering praise and thereby glorifying him / Edward Rawson (1676) -- You are thus in the hands of an angry God / Jonathan Edwards (1741) -- We fear not death / John Hancock (1774) -- As for me, give me liberty or give me death / Patrick Henry (1775) -- We have no other alternative than independence / Samual Adams (1776) -- The older I grow, the more apt I am to doubt my own judgement of others / Benjamin Franklin (1787) -- The states can never lose their powers / Alexander Hamilton (1787) -- Would the government have credit, without having the power of raising money? / James Madison (1788) -- 'Tis our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances / George Washington (1796) -- We are all Republicans; we are all Federalists / Thomas Jefferson (1801) -- Think of your forefathers and of your posterity / John Quincy Adams (1802) -- I charge you to protect his fame. It is all that he has left / Gouverneur Morris (1804) -- You have got our country, you want to force your religion upon us / Red Jacket (1805) -- We should consider any attempt on their part to extend their system to any portion of this hemisphere as dangerous / James Monroe (1823) -- Mind is the great lever of all things / Daniel Webster (1823) -- The cause in which our fathers shone is immortal / Edward Everet (1826)
  • Without union, our independence and liberty would never have been achieved / Andrew Jackson (1833) -- When he (Elijah Lovejoy) fell, civil authority was trampled under foot / Wendell Phillips (1837) -- How can the union be preserved? / John C. Calhoun (1850) -- There are influences that never sleep / Rufus Choate -- Let us look to our country and our cause / Henry Clay (1850) -- An essential wickedness that makes other public crimes seem like public virtues / Charles Sumner (1856) -- I believe this government cannot endure permanently, half slave and half free / Abraham Lincoln (1858) -- Leave the people free to do as they please / Stephen A. Douglas (1858) -- The irrepressible conflict / William H. Seward (1858) -- I feel no consciousness of guilt / John Brown (1859) -- No man existed who could look down on Burns / Ralph Waldo Emerson (1859) -- If you will have it thus, we will invoke the God of our fathers / Jefferson Davis (1861) -- We here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain / Abraham Lincoln (1863) -- With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right / Abraham Lincoln (1865) -- Hold each other in true fellowship / Henry Ward Beecher (1865). -- Are women persons? / Susann B. Anthony (1873) -- A perfect woman, nobly planned, to warm, to comfort, and command / Chauncey M. Depew (1875) -- There is a sumptuous variety about the New England weather / Samuel L. Clemens (1876) -- "You can not build a university on a sect, you must build it upon the nation / Charles W. Eliot (1877)
  • You can not live without lawyers, and certainly you cannot die without them / Joseph Hodges Choate (1880) -- The old world and the new / Carl Schurz (1881) -- He trod the wine-press alone / James G. Blaine (1882) -- There were tones in the voice that whispered then you may hear to-day in a hundred men / Oliver Wendell Holmes (1884) -- If a man is going to be an American at all let him be so without any qualifying adjectives / Henry Cabot Lodge, Sr. (1888) -- The country demands that every race measure itself by the American standard / Booker T. Washington (1896) -- You shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold / William Jennings Bryan (1896) -- I wish to preach not the doctrine of ignoble ease but the doctrine of the strenuous life / Theodore Roosevelt (1899) -- Life is a narrow vale between / Robert G. Ingersoll (1899) -- The right to cast the ballet is regarded as sacred. The right to make the ballet is equally sacred / Robert M. LaFollette (1902) -- He guards the sleep of his pauper master as if he were a prince / George Graham Vest (1903) -- One who looked through the confusion of the moment and has seen the moral issue involved / Jane Addams (1903) -- Patriotism, a menance to liberty / Emma Goldman (1910) -- Lincoln is become to us the test of human worth / Stephen S. Wise (1914) -- I like to have a man have a definite experience in religion / William A. (Billy) Sunday (1914) -- Only a peace between equals can last / Woodrow Wilson (1917) -- We will not chose the path of submission and suffer the most sacred rights, to be ignored and violated / Woodrow Wilson (1918) -- The program of the world's peace, is our program / Woodrow Wilson (1918)
  • I am prepared to receive your sentence / Eugene V. Debs (1918) -- To make permanent arrangements that justice shall be rendered and peace maintained / Woodrow Wilson (1919) -- Peace upon any other basis than national independence, is fit only for slaves / William Edgar Borah (1919) -- I am pleading that we overcome cruelty with kindness and hatred with love / Clarence S. Darrow (1924) -- I am here tonight representing poverty / Will Rogers (1924) -- Money is power and you ought to be reasonably ambitious to have it / Russell H. Conwell (1925) -- Trade unionism is not a discovery or a formula. It, evolved out of the needs of human experience / William Green (1925) -- I do not want any Catholic in the United States to vote for me because I am a Catholic / Alfred E. Smith (1928) -- The treasurer's report / Robert C. Benchley (1930) -- Live, I am coming / Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. (1931) -- The only thing we have to fear is fear itself / Franklin D. Roosevelt (1933) -- You should own no book that you are afraid to mark up / William Lyon Phelps (1933) -- You must fuse at white heat the several particles of your learning / Owen D. Young (1934) -- The Bill of Rights, is the expression of the spirit of men who would be forever free / Herbert Hoover (1935) -- Labor, like Israel, has many sorrows / John L. Lewis (1937) -- This is a middle-class country and the middle class will have its will and way / William Allen White (1937) -- In the great enterprise of making democracy workable we are all partners / Charles Evans Hughes (1939) -- A new integrity of human life / Frank Lloyd Wright (1939)
  • We are here to make a choice between the quick and the dead / Bernard M. Baruch (1946) -- Our policy is directed not against any country or doctrine but against hunger, poverty, desperation and chaos / George C. Marshall (1947) -- I suggest that the United Nations be reorganized without the communist nations in it / Herbert Hoover (1950) -- I decline to accept the end of man / William Faulkner (1950) -- Old soldiers never die ; they just fade away / Douglas MacArthur (1951) -- Without the United Nations our country would walk alone, ruled by fear / Eleanor (Mrs. F.D.) Roosevelt (1952) -- The ordeal of the twentieth century is far from over / Adlai E. Stevenson (1952) -- History does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or the timid / Dwight D. Eisenhower (1953) -- A toast to the ladies, bottoms up! / Cornelia Otis Skinner (1953) -- Our government cannot function properly unless the President is master in his own house / Harry S. Truman (1954) -- We know too much for one man to know much / J. Robert Oppenheimer (1954) -- Any problem in any part of the world ramifies into almost every part of the world / John Foster Dulles (1955) -- The competition is very tough, and in this contest there is no prize for second best / Alfred M. Gruenther (1956) -- Learn the lesson of the worm / William F. (Billy) Graham (1957) -- I am sick and tired of the snivelers, the defeated and the whiners / John Mason Brown (1958) -- Man can improve his material and physical lot without sacrificing his civil rights / Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. (1958) -- He was seen to weep / Carl Sandburg (1959)
Control code
ocm00270476
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
1st ed..
Extent
364 pages
Lccn
59012175
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)00270476
Label
A treasury of great American speeches : our country's life and history in the words of its great men, With illus. from various historical periods
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Liberty is the proper end and object of authority / John Winthrop (1645) -- That the Lord may behold us as a people, offering praise and thereby glorifying him / Edward Rawson (1676) -- You are thus in the hands of an angry God / Jonathan Edwards (1741) -- We fear not death / John Hancock (1774) -- As for me, give me liberty or give me death / Patrick Henry (1775) -- We have no other alternative than independence / Samual Adams (1776) -- The older I grow, the more apt I am to doubt my own judgement of others / Benjamin Franklin (1787) -- The states can never lose their powers / Alexander Hamilton (1787) -- Would the government have credit, without having the power of raising money? / James Madison (1788) -- 'Tis our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances / George Washington (1796) -- We are all Republicans; we are all Federalists / Thomas Jefferson (1801) -- Think of your forefathers and of your posterity / John Quincy Adams (1802) -- I charge you to protect his fame. It is all that he has left / Gouverneur Morris (1804) -- You have got our country, you want to force your religion upon us / Red Jacket (1805) -- We should consider any attempt on their part to extend their system to any portion of this hemisphere as dangerous / James Monroe (1823) -- Mind is the great lever of all things / Daniel Webster (1823) -- The cause in which our fathers shone is immortal / Edward Everet (1826)
  • Without union, our independence and liberty would never have been achieved / Andrew Jackson (1833) -- When he (Elijah Lovejoy) fell, civil authority was trampled under foot / Wendell Phillips (1837) -- How can the union be preserved? / John C. Calhoun (1850) -- There are influences that never sleep / Rufus Choate -- Let us look to our country and our cause / Henry Clay (1850) -- An essential wickedness that makes other public crimes seem like public virtues / Charles Sumner (1856) -- I believe this government cannot endure permanently, half slave and half free / Abraham Lincoln (1858) -- Leave the people free to do as they please / Stephen A. Douglas (1858) -- The irrepressible conflict / William H. Seward (1858) -- I feel no consciousness of guilt / John Brown (1859) -- No man existed who could look down on Burns / Ralph Waldo Emerson (1859) -- If you will have it thus, we will invoke the God of our fathers / Jefferson Davis (1861) -- We here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain / Abraham Lincoln (1863) -- With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right / Abraham Lincoln (1865) -- Hold each other in true fellowship / Henry Ward Beecher (1865). -- Are women persons? / Susann B. Anthony (1873) -- A perfect woman, nobly planned, to warm, to comfort, and command / Chauncey M. Depew (1875) -- There is a sumptuous variety about the New England weather / Samuel L. Clemens (1876) -- "You can not build a university on a sect, you must build it upon the nation / Charles W. Eliot (1877)
  • You can not live without lawyers, and certainly you cannot die without them / Joseph Hodges Choate (1880) -- The old world and the new / Carl Schurz (1881) -- He trod the wine-press alone / James G. Blaine (1882) -- There were tones in the voice that whispered then you may hear to-day in a hundred men / Oliver Wendell Holmes (1884) -- If a man is going to be an American at all let him be so without any qualifying adjectives / Henry Cabot Lodge, Sr. (1888) -- The country demands that every race measure itself by the American standard / Booker T. Washington (1896) -- You shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold / William Jennings Bryan (1896) -- I wish to preach not the doctrine of ignoble ease but the doctrine of the strenuous life / Theodore Roosevelt (1899) -- Life is a narrow vale between / Robert G. Ingersoll (1899) -- The right to cast the ballet is regarded as sacred. The right to make the ballet is equally sacred / Robert M. LaFollette (1902) -- He guards the sleep of his pauper master as if he were a prince / George Graham Vest (1903) -- One who looked through the confusion of the moment and has seen the moral issue involved / Jane Addams (1903) -- Patriotism, a menance to liberty / Emma Goldman (1910) -- Lincoln is become to us the test of human worth / Stephen S. Wise (1914) -- I like to have a man have a definite experience in religion / William A. (Billy) Sunday (1914) -- Only a peace between equals can last / Woodrow Wilson (1917) -- We will not chose the path of submission and suffer the most sacred rights, to be ignored and violated / Woodrow Wilson (1918) -- The program of the world's peace, is our program / Woodrow Wilson (1918)
  • I am prepared to receive your sentence / Eugene V. Debs (1918) -- To make permanent arrangements that justice shall be rendered and peace maintained / Woodrow Wilson (1919) -- Peace upon any other basis than national independence, is fit only for slaves / William Edgar Borah (1919) -- I am pleading that we overcome cruelty with kindness and hatred with love / Clarence S. Darrow (1924) -- I am here tonight representing poverty / Will Rogers (1924) -- Money is power and you ought to be reasonably ambitious to have it / Russell H. Conwell (1925) -- Trade unionism is not a discovery or a formula. It, evolved out of the needs of human experience / William Green (1925) -- I do not want any Catholic in the United States to vote for me because I am a Catholic / Alfred E. Smith (1928) -- The treasurer's report / Robert C. Benchley (1930) -- Live, I am coming / Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. (1931) -- The only thing we have to fear is fear itself / Franklin D. Roosevelt (1933) -- You should own no book that you are afraid to mark up / William Lyon Phelps (1933) -- You must fuse at white heat the several particles of your learning / Owen D. Young (1934) -- The Bill of Rights, is the expression of the spirit of men who would be forever free / Herbert Hoover (1935) -- Labor, like Israel, has many sorrows / John L. Lewis (1937) -- This is a middle-class country and the middle class will have its will and way / William Allen White (1937) -- In the great enterprise of making democracy workable we are all partners / Charles Evans Hughes (1939) -- A new integrity of human life / Frank Lloyd Wright (1939)
  • We are here to make a choice between the quick and the dead / Bernard M. Baruch (1946) -- Our policy is directed not against any country or doctrine but against hunger, poverty, desperation and chaos / George C. Marshall (1947) -- I suggest that the United Nations be reorganized without the communist nations in it / Herbert Hoover (1950) -- I decline to accept the end of man / William Faulkner (1950) -- Old soldiers never die ; they just fade away / Douglas MacArthur (1951) -- Without the United Nations our country would walk alone, ruled by fear / Eleanor (Mrs. F.D.) Roosevelt (1952) -- The ordeal of the twentieth century is far from over / Adlai E. Stevenson (1952) -- History does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or the timid / Dwight D. Eisenhower (1953) -- A toast to the ladies, bottoms up! / Cornelia Otis Skinner (1953) -- Our government cannot function properly unless the President is master in his own house / Harry S. Truman (1954) -- We know too much for one man to know much / J. Robert Oppenheimer (1954) -- Any problem in any part of the world ramifies into almost every part of the world / John Foster Dulles (1955) -- The competition is very tough, and in this contest there is no prize for second best / Alfred M. Gruenther (1956) -- Learn the lesson of the worm / William F. (Billy) Graham (1957) -- I am sick and tired of the snivelers, the defeated and the whiners / John Mason Brown (1958) -- Man can improve his material and physical lot without sacrificing his civil rights / Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. (1958) -- He was seen to weep / Carl Sandburg (1959)
Control code
ocm00270476
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
1st ed..
Extent
364 pages
Lccn
59012175
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)00270476

Library Locations

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      325 Superior Ave., N.E., Cleveland, OH, 44114, US
      41.501174 -81.69177499999999
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