Coverart for item
The Resource Andersonville : a story of Rebel military prisons, fifteen months a guest of the so-called southern confederacy : a private soldier's experience in Richmond, Andersonville, Savannah, Millen, Blackshear, and Florence, by John McElroy

Andersonville : a story of Rebel military prisons, fifteen months a guest of the so-called southern confederacy : a private soldier's experience in Richmond, Andersonville, Savannah, Millen, Blackshear, and Florence, by John McElroy

Label
Andersonville : a story of Rebel military prisons, fifteen months a guest of the so-called southern confederacy : a private soldier's experience in Richmond, Andersonville, Savannah, Millen, Blackshear, and Florence
Title
Andersonville
Title remainder
a story of Rebel military prisons, fifteen months a guest of the so-called southern confederacy : a private soldier's experience in Richmond, Andersonville, Savannah, Millen, Blackshear, and Florence
Statement of responsibility
by John McElroy
Title variation
  • Story of Rebel military prisons
  • Private soldier's experience in Richmond, Andersonville, Savannah, Millen, Blackshear, and Florence
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Additional physical form
Also issued online.
Biography type
autobiography
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1846-1929
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
McElroy, John
Dewey number
973.771
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
  • music
Index
no index present
LC call number
E612.A5
LC item number
M4
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Andersonville Prison
  • United States
Label
Andersonville : a story of Rebel military prisons, fifteen months a guest of the so-called southern confederacy : a private soldier's experience in Richmond, Andersonville, Savannah, Millen, Blackshear, and Florence, by John McElroy
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • I. A strange land ; The heart of the Appalachians ; The gateway of an empire ; A sequestered vale, and a primitive, Arcadian, non-progressive people -- II. Scarcity of food for the army ; Raid for forage ; Encounter with the Rebels ; Sharp cavalry fight ; Defeat of the "Johnnies" ; Powell's Valley opened up -- III. Living off the enemy ; Reveling in the fatness of the country ; Soldierly purveying and camp cookery ; Susceptible teamsters and their tendency to flightiness ; Making a soldier's bed -- IV. A bitter cold morning and a warm awakening ; Trouble all along the line ; Fierce conflicts, assaults and defense ; Prolonged and desperate struggle, ending with a surrender -- V. The reaction ; Depression ; Biting cold ; Sharp hunger and sad reflection -- VI. "On to Richmond!" ; Marching on foot over the mountains ; My horse has a new rider ; Unsophisticated mountain girls ; discussing the issues of the war ; Parting with Hiatoga -- VII. Entering Richmond ; Disappointment at its appearance ; Everybody in uniform ; Curled darlings of the capital ; The Rebel flag ; Libby Prison ; Dick Turner ; Searching the new comers -- VIII. Introduction to prison life ; The Pemberton Building and its occupants ; Neat sailors ; Roll call ; Rations and clothing ; Chivalric "confiscation" -- IX. Beans or peas ; Insufficiency of darky testimony ; A guard kills a prisoner ; Prisoners tease the guards ; Desperate outbreak -- X. The exchange and the cause of its interruption ; Brief resume of the different cartels, and the difficulties that led to their suspension -- XI. Putting in the time ; Rations ; Cooking utensils ; "Fiat" soup ; "Spooning" ; African newspaper venders ; Trading greenbacks for Confederate money ; Visit from John Morgan -- XII. Remarks as to nomenclature ; Vaccination and its effects ; "N'Yaarker's," their characteristics, and their methods of operating -- XIII. Belle Isle ; Terrible suffering from cold and hunger ; Fate of Lieutenant Boisseux's dog ; Our company mystery ; Termination of all hopes of its solution -- XIV. Hoping for exchange ; An exposition of the doctrine of chances ; Off for Andersonville ; Uncertainty as to our destination ; Arrival at Andersonville -- XV. Georgia ; A lean and hungry land ; Difference between upper and lower Georgia ; The village of Andersonville -- XVI. Waking up in Andersonville ; Some description of the place ; Our first mail ; Building shelter ; Gen. Winder ; Himself and lineage -- XVII. The plantation Negros ; Not too stupid to be loyal ; Their dithyrambic music ; Copperhead opinion of Longfellow -- XVIII. Schemes and plans to escape ; Scaling the stockade ; Establishing the dead line ; The first man killed -- XIX. Capt. Henri Wirz ; Some description of a small-minded personage, who gained great notoriety ; First experiences with his disciplinary method -- XX. Prize-fight among the N'Yaarkers ; A great many formalities, and little blood spilt ; A futile attempt to recover a watch ; Defeat of the Law and Order Party --
  • XXI. Diminishing rations ; A deadly cold rain ; Hovering over pitch pine fires ; Increase of mortality ; A theory of health -- XXII. Differences between Alabamians and Georgians ; Death of "Poll Parrott" ; A good joke upon the guard ; A brutal rascal -- XXIII. A new lot of prisoners ; The Battle of Oolustee ; Men sacrificed to a general's incompentency ; A hoodlum re-inforcement ; A queer crowd ; Mistreatment of an officer of a colored regiment ; Killing the sergeant of a Negro squad -- XXIV. April ; Longing to get out ; The death rate ; The plague of lice ; The so-called hospital -- XXV. The "Plymouth Pilgrims" ; Sad transition from comfortable barracks to Andersonville ; A crazed Pennsylvanian ; Development of the sutler business -- XXVI. Longings for God's country ; Considerations of the methods of getting there ; Exchange and escape ; Digging tunnels, and the difficulties connected therewith ; Punishment of a traitor -- XXVII. The hounds, and the difficulties they put in the way of escape ; The whole South patrolled by them -- XXVIII. May ; Influx of new prisoners ; Disparity in numbers between the eastern and western armies ; Terrible crowding ; Slaughter of men at the creek -- XXIX. Some distinction between soldier's duty and murder ; A plot to escape ; It is revealed and frustrated -- XXX. June ; Possibilities of a murderous cannonade ; What was proposed to be done in that event ; A false alarm ; Deterioration of the rations ; Fearful increase of mortality -- XXXI. Dying by inches ; Seitz, the slow, and his death ; Stiggall and Emerson ; Ravages of the scurvy -- XXXII. "Ole Boo," and "Ole Sol, the Haymaker" ; A fetid, burning desert ; Noisome water, and the effects of drinking it ; Stealing soft soap -- XXXIII. "Pour passer le temps" ; A set of chessmen procured under difficulties ; Religious services ; The devoted priest ; War song -- XXXIV. Maggots, lice and raiders ; Practices of these human vermin ; Plundering the sick and dying ; Night attacks, and battles by day ; Hard times for the small traders -- XXXV. A community without government ; Formation of the Regulators ; Raiders attack key but are bluffed off ; Assault of the Regulators on the Raiders ; Desperate battle ; Overthrow of the Raiders -- XXXVI. Why the Regulators were not assisted by the entire camp ; Peculiarities of boys from different sections ; Hunting the Raiders down ; Exploits of my left-handed lieutenant ; Running the gauntlet -- XXXVII. The execution ; Building the scaffold ; Doubts of the camp ; Captain Wirz thinks it is probably a ruse to force the stockade ; His preparations against such an attempt ; Entrance of the doomed ones ; They realize their fate ; One makes a desperate effort to escape ; His re-capture ; Intense excitement ; Wirz orders the guns to open ; Fortunately they do not ; The six are hanged ; One breaks his rope ; Scene when the Raiders are cut down -- XXXVIII. After the execution ; Formation of a police force ; Its first chief ; "Spanking" an offender -- XXXIX. July ; The prison becomes more crowded, the weather hotter, rations poorer, and mortality greater ; Some of the phenomena of suffering and death -- XL. The battle of the 22d of July ; The Army of the Tennessee assaulted front and rear ; Death of General McPherson ; Assumption of command by General Logan ; Result of the battle --
  • XLI. Clothing : its rapid deterioration, and devices to replenish it ; Desperate efforts to cover nakedness ; "Little Red Cap" and his letter -- XLII. Some features of the mortality ; Percentage of deaths to those living ; An average man only stands the misery three months ; Description of the prison and the condition of the men therein, by a leading scientific man of the South -- XLIII. Difficulty of exercising ; Embarrassments of a morning walk ; The Rialto of the prison ; Cursing the Southern Confederacy ; The story of the Battle of Spottsylvania Court House -- XLIV. Rebel music ; Singular lack of the creative power among the Southerners ; Contrast with similar people elsewhere ; Their favorite music, and where it was borrowed from ; A fifer with one tune -- XLV. August ; Needles stuck in pumpkin seeds ; Some phenomena of starvation ; Rioting in remembered luxuries -- XLVI. A surly Briton ; The stolid courage that makes the English flag a banner of triumph ; Our company bugler, his characteristics and his death ; Urgent demand for mechanics ; None want to go ; Treatment of a Rebel shoemaker ; Enlargement of the stockade ; It is broken by a storm ; The wonderful spring -- XLVII. "Sick call," and the scenes that accompanied it ; Mustering the lame, halt and diseased at the South Gate ; An unusually bad case ; Going out to the hospital ; Accommodation and treatment of the patients there ; The horrible suffering in the gangrene ward ; Bungling amputations by blundering practitioners ; Affection between a sailor and his ward ; Death of my comrade -- XLVIII. Determination to escape ; Different plans and their merits ; I prefer the Appalachicola route ; Preparations for departure ; A hot day ; The fence passed successfully ; Pursued by the hounds ; Caught ; Returned to the stockade -- XLIX. August ; Good luck in not meeting Captain Wirz ; That worthy's treatment of recaptured prisoners ; Secret societies in prison ; Singular meeting and its result ; Discovery and removal of the officers among the enlisted men -- L. Food ; Its meagerness, inferior quality, and terrible sameness ; Rebel testimony on the subject ; Futility of successful explanation -- LI. Solicitude as to the fate of Atlanta and Sherman's Army ; Paucity of news ; How we heard that Atlanta had fallen ; Announcement of a general exchange ; We leave Andersonville -- LII. Savannah ; Devices to obtain materials for a tent ; Their ultimate success ; Resumption of tunneling ; Escaping by wholesale and being re-captured en masse ; The obtacles that lay between us and our lines -- LIII. Frank Beaverstock's attempt at escape ; Passing off as a Rebel boy he reaches Griswoldville by rail, and then strikes across the country for Sherman, but is caught within twenty miles of our lines -- LIV. Savannah proves to be a change for the better ; Escape from the brats of guards ; Comparison between Wirz and Davis ; A brief interval of good rations ; Winder, the man with the evil eye ; The disloyal work of a shyster -- LV. Why we were hurried out of Andersonville ; The effect of the fall of Atlanta ; Our longing to hear the news ; Arrival of some fresh fish ; How we knew they were western boys ; Difference in the appearance of the soldiers of the two armies -- LVI. What caused the fall of Atlanta ; A dissertation upon an important psychological problem ; The Battle of Jonesboro ; Why it was fought ; How Sherman deceived Hood ; A desperate bayonet charge, and the only successful one in the Atlanta Campaign ; A gallant colonel and how he died ; The heroism of some enlisted men ; Going calmly certain death -- LVII. A fair sacrifice ; The story of one boy who willingly gave his young life for his country -- LVIII. We leave Savannah ; More hopes of exchange ; Scenes at departure ; "Flankers" ; On the back track toward Andersonville ; Alarm thereat ; At the parting of two ways ; We finally bring up at Camp Lawton -- LIX. Our new quarters at Camp Lawton ; Building a hut ; An exceptional commandant ; He is a good man, but will take bribes ; Rations -- LX. The Raiders re-appear in the scene ; The attempt to assassinate those who were concerned in the execution ; A couple of lively fights, in which the Raiders are defeated ; Holding an election --
  • LXI. The rebels formally propose to us to desert to them ; Contumelious treatment of the proposition ; Their rage ; An exciting time ; An outbreak threatened ; Difficulties attending desertion to the Rebels -- LXII. Sergeant Leroy L. Key ; His adventures subsequent to the execution ; He goes outside at Andersonville on parole ; Labors in the cookhouse ; Attempts to escape ; Is re-captured and taken to Macon ; Escapes from there, but is compelled to return ; Is finally exchanged at Savannah -- LXIII. Dreary weather ; The cold rains distress all and kill hundreds ; Exchange of ten thousand sick ; Captain Bowes turns a pretty, but not very honest, penny -- LXIV. Another removal ; Sherman's advance scares the Rebels into running us away from Millen ; We are taken to Savannah, and thence down the Atlantic and Gulf Road to Blackshear -- LXV. Blackshear and Pierce County ; We take up new quarters, but are called out for exchanges ; Excitement over signing the parole ; A happy journey to Savannah ; Grievous disappointment -- LXVI. A specimen conversation with an average native Georgian ; We learn that Sherman is heading for Savannah ; The reserves get a little setting down -- LXVII. Off to Charleston ; Passing through the rice swamps ; Two extremes of society ; Entry into Charleston ; Leisurely warfare ; Shelling the city at regular intervals ; We camp in a mass of ruins ; Departure for Florence -- LXVIII. First days at Florence ; Introduction to Lieutenant Barrett, the red-headed keeper ; A brief description of our new quarters ; Winder's malign influence manifest -- XLIX. Barrett's insane cruelty ; How he punished those alleged to be engaged in tunneling ; The misery in the stockade ; Men's limbs rotting off with dry gangrene -- LXX. House and clothes ; Efforts to erect a suitable residence ; Difficulties attending this ; Varieties of Florentine architecture ; Waiting for dead men's clothes ; Craving for tobacco -- LXXI. December ; Rations of wood and food grow less daily ; Uncertainty as to the mortality at Florence ; Even the governor's statistics are very deficient ; Care for the sick -- LXXII. Dull winter days ; Too weak and too stupid to amuse ourselves ; Attempts of the Rebels to recruit us into their army ; The class of men they obtained ; Vengeance on "the galvanized" ; A singular experience ; Rare glimpses of fun ; Inability of the Rebels to count -- LXXIII. Christmas, and the way it was passed ; The daily routine of ration drawing ; Some peculiarities of living and dying -- LXXIV. New Year's day ; Death of John H. Winder ; He dies on his way to a dinner ; Something as to character and career ; One of the worst men that ever lived -- LXXV. One instance of a successful escape ; The adventures of Sergeant Walter Hartsough, of Company K, Sixteenth Illinois Cavalry ; He gets away from the Rebels at Thomasville, and after a toilsome and dangerous journey of several hundred miles, reaches our lines in Florida -- LXXVI. The peculiar type of insanity prevalent at Florence ; Barrett's wantonness of cruelty ; We learn of Sherman's advances into South Carolina ; The Rebels begin moving the prisoners away ; Andrews and I change our tactics, and stay behind ; Arrival of five prisoners from Sherman's command ; Their unbounded confidence in Sherman's success, and its beneficial effect upon us -- LXXVII. Fruitless waiting for Sherman ; We leave Florence ; Intelligence of the fall of Wilmington communicated to us by a slave ; The turpentine region of North Carolina ; We come upon a Rebel line of battle ; Yankees at both ends of the road -- LXXVIII. Return to Florence and a short sojourn there ; Off toward Wilmington again ; Cribbing a Rebel officer's lunch ; Signs of approaching our lines ; Terror of our rascally guards ; Entrance into God's country at last -- LXXIX. Getting used to freedom ; Delights of a land where there is enough of everything ; First glimpse of the old flag ; Wilmington and its history ; Lieutenant Cushing ; First acquaintance with the colored troops ; Leaving for home ; Destruction of the "Thorn" by a torpedo ; The Mock Monitor's achievement -- LXXX. Visit to Fort Fisher, and inspection of that stronghold ; The way it was captured ; Out on the ocean sailing ; Terribly sea sick ; Rapid recovery ; Arrival at Annapolis ; Washed, clothed and fed ; Unbounded luxury, and days of unadulterated happiness --
  • LXXXI. Religious life and work in Andersonville ; How captured ; Impressions on reaching the prison ; How treated ; Longing for religious companions ; Notes from day to day ; Coadjutors in organizing prayer meetings ; Brutal treatment of the sick by Rebels ; Meager rations, etc. -- LXXXII. Captain Wirz, the only one of the prison-keepers punished ; His arrest, trial and execution -- LXXXIII. The responsibility ; Who was to blame for all the misery ; An examination of the flimsy excuses made for the Rebels ; One document that convicts them ; What is desired
Control code
ocm01363147
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
654 pages
Lccn
02000872
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations, music, maps
System control number
(OCoLC)01363147
Label
Andersonville : a story of Rebel military prisons, fifteen months a guest of the so-called southern confederacy : a private soldier's experience in Richmond, Andersonville, Savannah, Millen, Blackshear, and Florence, by John McElroy
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • I. A strange land ; The heart of the Appalachians ; The gateway of an empire ; A sequestered vale, and a primitive, Arcadian, non-progressive people -- II. Scarcity of food for the army ; Raid for forage ; Encounter with the Rebels ; Sharp cavalry fight ; Defeat of the "Johnnies" ; Powell's Valley opened up -- III. Living off the enemy ; Reveling in the fatness of the country ; Soldierly purveying and camp cookery ; Susceptible teamsters and their tendency to flightiness ; Making a soldier's bed -- IV. A bitter cold morning and a warm awakening ; Trouble all along the line ; Fierce conflicts, assaults and defense ; Prolonged and desperate struggle, ending with a surrender -- V. The reaction ; Depression ; Biting cold ; Sharp hunger and sad reflection -- VI. "On to Richmond!" ; Marching on foot over the mountains ; My horse has a new rider ; Unsophisticated mountain girls ; discussing the issues of the war ; Parting with Hiatoga -- VII. Entering Richmond ; Disappointment at its appearance ; Everybody in uniform ; Curled darlings of the capital ; The Rebel flag ; Libby Prison ; Dick Turner ; Searching the new comers -- VIII. Introduction to prison life ; The Pemberton Building and its occupants ; Neat sailors ; Roll call ; Rations and clothing ; Chivalric "confiscation" -- IX. Beans or peas ; Insufficiency of darky testimony ; A guard kills a prisoner ; Prisoners tease the guards ; Desperate outbreak -- X. The exchange and the cause of its interruption ; Brief resume of the different cartels, and the difficulties that led to their suspension -- XI. Putting in the time ; Rations ; Cooking utensils ; "Fiat" soup ; "Spooning" ; African newspaper venders ; Trading greenbacks for Confederate money ; Visit from John Morgan -- XII. Remarks as to nomenclature ; Vaccination and its effects ; "N'Yaarker's," their characteristics, and their methods of operating -- XIII. Belle Isle ; Terrible suffering from cold and hunger ; Fate of Lieutenant Boisseux's dog ; Our company mystery ; Termination of all hopes of its solution -- XIV. Hoping for exchange ; An exposition of the doctrine of chances ; Off for Andersonville ; Uncertainty as to our destination ; Arrival at Andersonville -- XV. Georgia ; A lean and hungry land ; Difference between upper and lower Georgia ; The village of Andersonville -- XVI. Waking up in Andersonville ; Some description of the place ; Our first mail ; Building shelter ; Gen. Winder ; Himself and lineage -- XVII. The plantation Negros ; Not too stupid to be loyal ; Their dithyrambic music ; Copperhead opinion of Longfellow -- XVIII. Schemes and plans to escape ; Scaling the stockade ; Establishing the dead line ; The first man killed -- XIX. Capt. Henri Wirz ; Some description of a small-minded personage, who gained great notoriety ; First experiences with his disciplinary method -- XX. Prize-fight among the N'Yaarkers ; A great many formalities, and little blood spilt ; A futile attempt to recover a watch ; Defeat of the Law and Order Party --
  • XXI. Diminishing rations ; A deadly cold rain ; Hovering over pitch pine fires ; Increase of mortality ; A theory of health -- XXII. Differences between Alabamians and Georgians ; Death of "Poll Parrott" ; A good joke upon the guard ; A brutal rascal -- XXIII. A new lot of prisoners ; The Battle of Oolustee ; Men sacrificed to a general's incompentency ; A hoodlum re-inforcement ; A queer crowd ; Mistreatment of an officer of a colored regiment ; Killing the sergeant of a Negro squad -- XXIV. April ; Longing to get out ; The death rate ; The plague of lice ; The so-called hospital -- XXV. The "Plymouth Pilgrims" ; Sad transition from comfortable barracks to Andersonville ; A crazed Pennsylvanian ; Development of the sutler business -- XXVI. Longings for God's country ; Considerations of the methods of getting there ; Exchange and escape ; Digging tunnels, and the difficulties connected therewith ; Punishment of a traitor -- XXVII. The hounds, and the difficulties they put in the way of escape ; The whole South patrolled by them -- XXVIII. May ; Influx of new prisoners ; Disparity in numbers between the eastern and western armies ; Terrible crowding ; Slaughter of men at the creek -- XXIX. Some distinction between soldier's duty and murder ; A plot to escape ; It is revealed and frustrated -- XXX. June ; Possibilities of a murderous cannonade ; What was proposed to be done in that event ; A false alarm ; Deterioration of the rations ; Fearful increase of mortality -- XXXI. Dying by inches ; Seitz, the slow, and his death ; Stiggall and Emerson ; Ravages of the scurvy -- XXXII. "Ole Boo," and "Ole Sol, the Haymaker" ; A fetid, burning desert ; Noisome water, and the effects of drinking it ; Stealing soft soap -- XXXIII. "Pour passer le temps" ; A set of chessmen procured under difficulties ; Religious services ; The devoted priest ; War song -- XXXIV. Maggots, lice and raiders ; Practices of these human vermin ; Plundering the sick and dying ; Night attacks, and battles by day ; Hard times for the small traders -- XXXV. A community without government ; Formation of the Regulators ; Raiders attack key but are bluffed off ; Assault of the Regulators on the Raiders ; Desperate battle ; Overthrow of the Raiders -- XXXVI. Why the Regulators were not assisted by the entire camp ; Peculiarities of boys from different sections ; Hunting the Raiders down ; Exploits of my left-handed lieutenant ; Running the gauntlet -- XXXVII. The execution ; Building the scaffold ; Doubts of the camp ; Captain Wirz thinks it is probably a ruse to force the stockade ; His preparations against such an attempt ; Entrance of the doomed ones ; They realize their fate ; One makes a desperate effort to escape ; His re-capture ; Intense excitement ; Wirz orders the guns to open ; Fortunately they do not ; The six are hanged ; One breaks his rope ; Scene when the Raiders are cut down -- XXXVIII. After the execution ; Formation of a police force ; Its first chief ; "Spanking" an offender -- XXXIX. July ; The prison becomes more crowded, the weather hotter, rations poorer, and mortality greater ; Some of the phenomena of suffering and death -- XL. The battle of the 22d of July ; The Army of the Tennessee assaulted front and rear ; Death of General McPherson ; Assumption of command by General Logan ; Result of the battle --
  • XLI. Clothing : its rapid deterioration, and devices to replenish it ; Desperate efforts to cover nakedness ; "Little Red Cap" and his letter -- XLII. Some features of the mortality ; Percentage of deaths to those living ; An average man only stands the misery three months ; Description of the prison and the condition of the men therein, by a leading scientific man of the South -- XLIII. Difficulty of exercising ; Embarrassments of a morning walk ; The Rialto of the prison ; Cursing the Southern Confederacy ; The story of the Battle of Spottsylvania Court House -- XLIV. Rebel music ; Singular lack of the creative power among the Southerners ; Contrast with similar people elsewhere ; Their favorite music, and where it was borrowed from ; A fifer with one tune -- XLV. August ; Needles stuck in pumpkin seeds ; Some phenomena of starvation ; Rioting in remembered luxuries -- XLVI. A surly Briton ; The stolid courage that makes the English flag a banner of triumph ; Our company bugler, his characteristics and his death ; Urgent demand for mechanics ; None want to go ; Treatment of a Rebel shoemaker ; Enlargement of the stockade ; It is broken by a storm ; The wonderful spring -- XLVII. "Sick call," and the scenes that accompanied it ; Mustering the lame, halt and diseased at the South Gate ; An unusually bad case ; Going out to the hospital ; Accommodation and treatment of the patients there ; The horrible suffering in the gangrene ward ; Bungling amputations by blundering practitioners ; Affection between a sailor and his ward ; Death of my comrade -- XLVIII. Determination to escape ; Different plans and their merits ; I prefer the Appalachicola route ; Preparations for departure ; A hot day ; The fence passed successfully ; Pursued by the hounds ; Caught ; Returned to the stockade -- XLIX. August ; Good luck in not meeting Captain Wirz ; That worthy's treatment of recaptured prisoners ; Secret societies in prison ; Singular meeting and its result ; Discovery and removal of the officers among the enlisted men -- L. Food ; Its meagerness, inferior quality, and terrible sameness ; Rebel testimony on the subject ; Futility of successful explanation -- LI. Solicitude as to the fate of Atlanta and Sherman's Army ; Paucity of news ; How we heard that Atlanta had fallen ; Announcement of a general exchange ; We leave Andersonville -- LII. Savannah ; Devices to obtain materials for a tent ; Their ultimate success ; Resumption of tunneling ; Escaping by wholesale and being re-captured en masse ; The obtacles that lay between us and our lines -- LIII. Frank Beaverstock's attempt at escape ; Passing off as a Rebel boy he reaches Griswoldville by rail, and then strikes across the country for Sherman, but is caught within twenty miles of our lines -- LIV. Savannah proves to be a change for the better ; Escape from the brats of guards ; Comparison between Wirz and Davis ; A brief interval of good rations ; Winder, the man with the evil eye ; The disloyal work of a shyster -- LV. Why we were hurried out of Andersonville ; The effect of the fall of Atlanta ; Our longing to hear the news ; Arrival of some fresh fish ; How we knew they were western boys ; Difference in the appearance of the soldiers of the two armies -- LVI. What caused the fall of Atlanta ; A dissertation upon an important psychological problem ; The Battle of Jonesboro ; Why it was fought ; How Sherman deceived Hood ; A desperate bayonet charge, and the only successful one in the Atlanta Campaign ; A gallant colonel and how he died ; The heroism of some enlisted men ; Going calmly certain death -- LVII. A fair sacrifice ; The story of one boy who willingly gave his young life for his country -- LVIII. We leave Savannah ; More hopes of exchange ; Scenes at departure ; "Flankers" ; On the back track toward Andersonville ; Alarm thereat ; At the parting of two ways ; We finally bring up at Camp Lawton -- LIX. Our new quarters at Camp Lawton ; Building a hut ; An exceptional commandant ; He is a good man, but will take bribes ; Rations -- LX. The Raiders re-appear in the scene ; The attempt to assassinate those who were concerned in the execution ; A couple of lively fights, in which the Raiders are defeated ; Holding an election --
  • LXI. The rebels formally propose to us to desert to them ; Contumelious treatment of the proposition ; Their rage ; An exciting time ; An outbreak threatened ; Difficulties attending desertion to the Rebels -- LXII. Sergeant Leroy L. Key ; His adventures subsequent to the execution ; He goes outside at Andersonville on parole ; Labors in the cookhouse ; Attempts to escape ; Is re-captured and taken to Macon ; Escapes from there, but is compelled to return ; Is finally exchanged at Savannah -- LXIII. Dreary weather ; The cold rains distress all and kill hundreds ; Exchange of ten thousand sick ; Captain Bowes turns a pretty, but not very honest, penny -- LXIV. Another removal ; Sherman's advance scares the Rebels into running us away from Millen ; We are taken to Savannah, and thence down the Atlantic and Gulf Road to Blackshear -- LXV. Blackshear and Pierce County ; We take up new quarters, but are called out for exchanges ; Excitement over signing the parole ; A happy journey to Savannah ; Grievous disappointment -- LXVI. A specimen conversation with an average native Georgian ; We learn that Sherman is heading for Savannah ; The reserves get a little setting down -- LXVII. Off to Charleston ; Passing through the rice swamps ; Two extremes of society ; Entry into Charleston ; Leisurely warfare ; Shelling the city at regular intervals ; We camp in a mass of ruins ; Departure for Florence -- LXVIII. First days at Florence ; Introduction to Lieutenant Barrett, the red-headed keeper ; A brief description of our new quarters ; Winder's malign influence manifest -- XLIX. Barrett's insane cruelty ; How he punished those alleged to be engaged in tunneling ; The misery in the stockade ; Men's limbs rotting off with dry gangrene -- LXX. House and clothes ; Efforts to erect a suitable residence ; Difficulties attending this ; Varieties of Florentine architecture ; Waiting for dead men's clothes ; Craving for tobacco -- LXXI. December ; Rations of wood and food grow less daily ; Uncertainty as to the mortality at Florence ; Even the governor's statistics are very deficient ; Care for the sick -- LXXII. Dull winter days ; Too weak and too stupid to amuse ourselves ; Attempts of the Rebels to recruit us into their army ; The class of men they obtained ; Vengeance on "the galvanized" ; A singular experience ; Rare glimpses of fun ; Inability of the Rebels to count -- LXXIII. Christmas, and the way it was passed ; The daily routine of ration drawing ; Some peculiarities of living and dying -- LXXIV. New Year's day ; Death of John H. Winder ; He dies on his way to a dinner ; Something as to character and career ; One of the worst men that ever lived -- LXXV. One instance of a successful escape ; The adventures of Sergeant Walter Hartsough, of Company K, Sixteenth Illinois Cavalry ; He gets away from the Rebels at Thomasville, and after a toilsome and dangerous journey of several hundred miles, reaches our lines in Florida -- LXXVI. The peculiar type of insanity prevalent at Florence ; Barrett's wantonness of cruelty ; We learn of Sherman's advances into South Carolina ; The Rebels begin moving the prisoners away ; Andrews and I change our tactics, and stay behind ; Arrival of five prisoners from Sherman's command ; Their unbounded confidence in Sherman's success, and its beneficial effect upon us -- LXXVII. Fruitless waiting for Sherman ; We leave Florence ; Intelligence of the fall of Wilmington communicated to us by a slave ; The turpentine region of North Carolina ; We come upon a Rebel line of battle ; Yankees at both ends of the road -- LXXVIII. Return to Florence and a short sojourn there ; Off toward Wilmington again ; Cribbing a Rebel officer's lunch ; Signs of approaching our lines ; Terror of our rascally guards ; Entrance into God's country at last -- LXXIX. Getting used to freedom ; Delights of a land where there is enough of everything ; First glimpse of the old flag ; Wilmington and its history ; Lieutenant Cushing ; First acquaintance with the colored troops ; Leaving for home ; Destruction of the "Thorn" by a torpedo ; The Mock Monitor's achievement -- LXXX. Visit to Fort Fisher, and inspection of that stronghold ; The way it was captured ; Out on the ocean sailing ; Terribly sea sick ; Rapid recovery ; Arrival at Annapolis ; Washed, clothed and fed ; Unbounded luxury, and days of unadulterated happiness --
  • LXXXI. Religious life and work in Andersonville ; How captured ; Impressions on reaching the prison ; How treated ; Longing for religious companions ; Notes from day to day ; Coadjutors in organizing prayer meetings ; Brutal treatment of the sick by Rebels ; Meager rations, etc. -- LXXXII. Captain Wirz, the only one of the prison-keepers punished ; His arrest, trial and execution -- LXXXIII. The responsibility ; Who was to blame for all the misery ; An examination of the flimsy excuses made for the Rebels ; One document that convicts them ; What is desired
Control code
ocm01363147
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
654 pages
Lccn
02000872
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations, music, maps
System control number
(OCoLC)01363147

Library Locations

    • CLEVELAND/Main LibraryBorrow it
      325 Superior Ave., N.E., Cleveland, OH, 44114, US
      41.501174 -81.69177499999999
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