Coverart for item
The Resource Digital labour and Karl Marx, Christian Fuchs

Digital labour and Karl Marx, Christian Fuchs

Label
Digital labour and Karl Marx
Title
Digital labour and Karl Marx
Statement of responsibility
Christian Fuchs
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1976-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Fuchs, Christian
Dewey number
335.4/12
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
HD8039.K59
LC item number
F83 2014
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Knowledge workers
  • Information technology
  • Information technology
  • Industrial sociology
Label
Digital labour and Karl Marx, Christian Fuchs
Link
https://shibboleth2sp.gar.semcs.net/Shibboleth.sso/Login?entityID=https%3A%2F%2Fpassport01.leeds.ac.uk%2Fidp%2Fshibboleth&target=https%3A%2F%2Fshibboleth2sp.gar.semcs.net%2Fshib%3Fdest%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.vlebooks.com%252FSHIBBOLETH%253Fdest%253Dhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.vlebooks.com%25252Fvleweb%25252Fproduct%25252Fopenreader%25253Fid%25253DLeedsUni%252526isbn%25253D9781134747061
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 363-388) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Theoretical Foundations of Studying Digital Labour
  • 2.
  • An Introduction to Karl Marx's Theory
  • 2.1.
  • Introduction
  • 2.2.
  • Marx on Work and Labour
  • 2.2.1.
  • Work and Labour in Society
  • 2.2.2.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Labour in Capitalism and Other Class Societies
  • 2.2.3.
  • Work in Communism
  • 2.3.
  • Marx's Labour Theory of Value
  • 2.3.1.
  • The German Debate on Marx's Labour Theory of Value
  • 2.3.2.
  • A Reconstruction of Marx's Labour Theory of Value
  • 2.3.2.1.
  • 1.
  • Use-Value and Value
  • 2.3.2.2.
  • Exchange-Value
  • 2.3.2.3.
  • Money and Price
  • 2.3.2.4.
  • The Value and Price of Labour-Power
  • 2.3.2.5.
  • Surplus Value
  • 2.4.
  • Introduction
  • Conclusion
  • 3.
  • Contemporary Cultural Studies and Karl Marx
  • 3.1.
  • Introduction
  • 3.2.
  • Lawrence Grossberg: Cultural Studies in the Future Tense
  • 3.3.
  • John Hartley: Digital Futures for Cultural and Media Studies
  • 1.1.
  • The Need for Studying Digital Labour
  • 1.2.
  • The Disappearance and Return of Karl Marx
  • pt. I
  • 4.2.
  • The Importance of Critical Political Economy, Critical Theory and Dallas Smythe
  • 4.3.
  • The Renewal of the Audience Labour- and Audience Commodity-Debate
  • 4.4.
  • Digital Labour: Capital Accumulation and Commodification on Social Media
  • 4.5.
  • Ideology, Play and Digital Labour
  • 4.6.
  • A Critique of the Critique of Digital Labour
  • 3.4.
  • 4.7.
  • Conclusion
  • 5.
  • Capitalism or Information Society?
  • 5.1.
  • Introduction
  • 5.2.
  • A Classification of Information Society Theories
  • 5.3.
  • An Alternative View of the Information Society
  • Paul Smith: The Renewal of Cultural Studies
  • 5.4.
  • Information Society Indicators: Measuring the Information Society
  • 5.5.
  • Conclusion
  • pt. II
  • Analysing Digital Labour: Case Studies
  • 6.
  • Digital Slavery: Slave Work in ICT-Related Mineral Extraction
  • 6.1.
  • Introduction
  • 3.5.
  • 6.2.
  • Marx on Modes of Production
  • 6.2.1.
  • Unpaid Work in the Family as Mode of Production
  • 6.2.2.
  • Ancient and Feudal Slavery as Modes of Production
  • Conclusion
  • 4.
  • Dallas Smythe and Audience Labour Today
  • 4.1.
  • Introduction
  • 6.5.
  • The Relations of Production of Mineral Extraction in the International Division of Digital Labour
  • 6.6.
  • Conclusion
  • 7.
  • Exploitation at Foxconn: Primitive Accumulation and the Formal Subsumption of Labour
  • 7.1.
  • Introduction
  • 7.2.
  • Foxconn's Productive Forces in the International Division of Digital Labour: Labour-Power and the Objects, Tools and Products of Labour
  • 6.2.3.
  • 7.3.
  • Foxconn's Relations of Production in the International Division of Digital Labour
  • 7.4.
  • Conclusion
  • 8.
  • The New Imperialism's Division of Labour: Work in the Indian Software Industry
  • 8.1.
  • Introduction
  • 8.2.
  • The Indian Software Industry's Productive Forces in the International Division of Digital Labour: Labour-Power and the Objects, Tools and Products of Labour
  • The Capitalist Mode of Production
  • 6.2.4.
  • Informational Productive Forces
  • 6.3.
  • Digital Media and Minerals
  • 6.4.
  • The Productive Forces of Mineral Extraction in the International Division of Digital Labour: Labour-Power and the Objects, Tools and Products of Labour
  • 9.2.
  • Silicon Valley's Productive Forces in the International Division of Digital Labour: Labour-Power and the Objects, Tools and Products of Labour
  • 9.3.
  • The Relations of Production of Google and the Silicon Valley in the International Division of Digital Labour
  • 9.4.
  • Conclusion
  • 10.
  • Tayloristic, Housewifized Service Labour: The Example of Call Centre Work
  • 10.1.
  • Introduction
  • 8.3.
  • 10.2.
  • The Call Centre's Productive Forces in the International Division of Digital Labour: Labour-Power and the Objects, Tools and Products of Labour
  • 10.3.
  • The Call Centre's Relations of Production in the International Division of Digital Labour
  • 10.4.
  • Conclusion
  • 11.
  • Theorizing Digital Labour on Social Media
  • The Indian Software Industry's Relations of Production in the International Division of Digital Labour
  • 8.4.
  • Conclusion
  • 9.
  • The Silicon Valley of Dreams and Nightmares of Exploitation: The Google Labour Aristocracy and Its Context
  • 9.1.
  • Introduction
  • 11.3.2.
  • Digital Labour on Social Media
  • 11.3.3.
  • Digital Labour and the Law of Value on Social Media
  • 11.4.
  • Conclusion
  • pt. III
  • Conclusions
  • 12.
  • Digital Labour and Struggles for Digital Work: The Occupy Movement as a New Working-Class Movement? Social Media as Working-Class Social Media?
  • 11.1.
  • 12.1.
  • Conclusion of Chapters 2 -- 11
  • 12.2.
  • Digital Work and the Commons
  • 12.3.
  • The Occupy Movement: A New Working-Class Movement?
  • 12.3.1.
  • Social Movement Theory
  • 12.3.2.
  • The Occupy Movement in Contemporary Political Theory
  • Introduction
  • 12.3.3.
  • The Occupy Movement's Self-Understanding
  • 12.3.4.
  • What Is the Occupy Movement?
  • 12.4.
  • Occupy, Digital Work and Working-Class Social Media
  • 11.2.
  • Users and the Productive Forces in the International Division of Digital Labour: Labour-Power and the Objects, Tools and Products of Labour
  • 11.3.
  • Users and the Relations of Production in the International Division of Digital Labour
  • 11.3.1.
  • Digital Work on Social Media
  • 12.4.2.3.
  • Position 3 -- Dualism: Social Media Have Been an Important Tool of the Occupy Movement; There Are Technological and Societal Causes of the Movement
  • 12.4.2.4.
  • Position 4 -- Social Media and Contradictions: A Dialectical View
  • 12.4.3.
  • A Theoretical Classification of Social Media Use in the Occupy Movement
  • 12.5.
  • Conclusion
  • 13.
  • Digital Labour Keywords
  • 12.4.1.
  • Social Movements, the Internet and Social Media
  • 12.4.2.
  • The Occupy Movement and Social Media
  • 12.4.2.1.
  • Position 1 -- Technological Determinism: The Occupy Movement (and Other Rebellions) Are Internet Rebellions
  • 12.4.2.2.
  • Position 2 -- Social Constructivism: We Have Been Witnessing Social Rebellions and Social Revolutions, Where Social Media Have Had Minor Importance; Social Media Are No Relevant Factor in Rebellions
Control code
ocn843785416
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xv, 403 pages
Isbn
9780415716154
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Lccn
2013017800
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other control number
40023051162
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)843785416
Label
Digital labour and Karl Marx, Christian Fuchs
Link
https://shibboleth2sp.gar.semcs.net/Shibboleth.sso/Login?entityID=https%3A%2F%2Fpassport01.leeds.ac.uk%2Fidp%2Fshibboleth&target=https%3A%2F%2Fshibboleth2sp.gar.semcs.net%2Fshib%3Fdest%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.vlebooks.com%252FSHIBBOLETH%253Fdest%253Dhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.vlebooks.com%25252Fvleweb%25252Fproduct%25252Fopenreader%25253Fid%25253DLeedsUni%252526isbn%25253D9781134747061
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 363-388) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Theoretical Foundations of Studying Digital Labour
  • 2.
  • An Introduction to Karl Marx's Theory
  • 2.1.
  • Introduction
  • 2.2.
  • Marx on Work and Labour
  • 2.2.1.
  • Work and Labour in Society
  • 2.2.2.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Labour in Capitalism and Other Class Societies
  • 2.2.3.
  • Work in Communism
  • 2.3.
  • Marx's Labour Theory of Value
  • 2.3.1.
  • The German Debate on Marx's Labour Theory of Value
  • 2.3.2.
  • A Reconstruction of Marx's Labour Theory of Value
  • 2.3.2.1.
  • 1.
  • Use-Value and Value
  • 2.3.2.2.
  • Exchange-Value
  • 2.3.2.3.
  • Money and Price
  • 2.3.2.4.
  • The Value and Price of Labour-Power
  • 2.3.2.5.
  • Surplus Value
  • 2.4.
  • Introduction
  • Conclusion
  • 3.
  • Contemporary Cultural Studies and Karl Marx
  • 3.1.
  • Introduction
  • 3.2.
  • Lawrence Grossberg: Cultural Studies in the Future Tense
  • 3.3.
  • John Hartley: Digital Futures for Cultural and Media Studies
  • 1.1.
  • The Need for Studying Digital Labour
  • 1.2.
  • The Disappearance and Return of Karl Marx
  • pt. I
  • 4.2.
  • The Importance of Critical Political Economy, Critical Theory and Dallas Smythe
  • 4.3.
  • The Renewal of the Audience Labour- and Audience Commodity-Debate
  • 4.4.
  • Digital Labour: Capital Accumulation and Commodification on Social Media
  • 4.5.
  • Ideology, Play and Digital Labour
  • 4.6.
  • A Critique of the Critique of Digital Labour
  • 3.4.
  • 4.7.
  • Conclusion
  • 5.
  • Capitalism or Information Society?
  • 5.1.
  • Introduction
  • 5.2.
  • A Classification of Information Society Theories
  • 5.3.
  • An Alternative View of the Information Society
  • Paul Smith: The Renewal of Cultural Studies
  • 5.4.
  • Information Society Indicators: Measuring the Information Society
  • 5.5.
  • Conclusion
  • pt. II
  • Analysing Digital Labour: Case Studies
  • 6.
  • Digital Slavery: Slave Work in ICT-Related Mineral Extraction
  • 6.1.
  • Introduction
  • 3.5.
  • 6.2.
  • Marx on Modes of Production
  • 6.2.1.
  • Unpaid Work in the Family as Mode of Production
  • 6.2.2.
  • Ancient and Feudal Slavery as Modes of Production
  • Conclusion
  • 4.
  • Dallas Smythe and Audience Labour Today
  • 4.1.
  • Introduction
  • 6.5.
  • The Relations of Production of Mineral Extraction in the International Division of Digital Labour
  • 6.6.
  • Conclusion
  • 7.
  • Exploitation at Foxconn: Primitive Accumulation and the Formal Subsumption of Labour
  • 7.1.
  • Introduction
  • 7.2.
  • Foxconn's Productive Forces in the International Division of Digital Labour: Labour-Power and the Objects, Tools and Products of Labour
  • 6.2.3.
  • 7.3.
  • Foxconn's Relations of Production in the International Division of Digital Labour
  • 7.4.
  • Conclusion
  • 8.
  • The New Imperialism's Division of Labour: Work in the Indian Software Industry
  • 8.1.
  • Introduction
  • 8.2.
  • The Indian Software Industry's Productive Forces in the International Division of Digital Labour: Labour-Power and the Objects, Tools and Products of Labour
  • The Capitalist Mode of Production
  • 6.2.4.
  • Informational Productive Forces
  • 6.3.
  • Digital Media and Minerals
  • 6.4.
  • The Productive Forces of Mineral Extraction in the International Division of Digital Labour: Labour-Power and the Objects, Tools and Products of Labour
  • 9.2.
  • Silicon Valley's Productive Forces in the International Division of Digital Labour: Labour-Power and the Objects, Tools and Products of Labour
  • 9.3.
  • The Relations of Production of Google and the Silicon Valley in the International Division of Digital Labour
  • 9.4.
  • Conclusion
  • 10.
  • Tayloristic, Housewifized Service Labour: The Example of Call Centre Work
  • 10.1.
  • Introduction
  • 8.3.
  • 10.2.
  • The Call Centre's Productive Forces in the International Division of Digital Labour: Labour-Power and the Objects, Tools and Products of Labour
  • 10.3.
  • The Call Centre's Relations of Production in the International Division of Digital Labour
  • 10.4.
  • Conclusion
  • 11.
  • Theorizing Digital Labour on Social Media
  • The Indian Software Industry's Relations of Production in the International Division of Digital Labour
  • 8.4.
  • Conclusion
  • 9.
  • The Silicon Valley of Dreams and Nightmares of Exploitation: The Google Labour Aristocracy and Its Context
  • 9.1.
  • Introduction
  • 11.3.2.
  • Digital Labour on Social Media
  • 11.3.3.
  • Digital Labour and the Law of Value on Social Media
  • 11.4.
  • Conclusion
  • pt. III
  • Conclusions
  • 12.
  • Digital Labour and Struggles for Digital Work: The Occupy Movement as a New Working-Class Movement? Social Media as Working-Class Social Media?
  • 11.1.
  • 12.1.
  • Conclusion of Chapters 2 -- 11
  • 12.2.
  • Digital Work and the Commons
  • 12.3.
  • The Occupy Movement: A New Working-Class Movement?
  • 12.3.1.
  • Social Movement Theory
  • 12.3.2.
  • The Occupy Movement in Contemporary Political Theory
  • Introduction
  • 12.3.3.
  • The Occupy Movement's Self-Understanding
  • 12.3.4.
  • What Is the Occupy Movement?
  • 12.4.
  • Occupy, Digital Work and Working-Class Social Media
  • 11.2.
  • Users and the Productive Forces in the International Division of Digital Labour: Labour-Power and the Objects, Tools and Products of Labour
  • 11.3.
  • Users and the Relations of Production in the International Division of Digital Labour
  • 11.3.1.
  • Digital Work on Social Media
  • 12.4.2.3.
  • Position 3 -- Dualism: Social Media Have Been an Important Tool of the Occupy Movement; There Are Technological and Societal Causes of the Movement
  • 12.4.2.4.
  • Position 4 -- Social Media and Contradictions: A Dialectical View
  • 12.4.3.
  • A Theoretical Classification of Social Media Use in the Occupy Movement
  • 12.5.
  • Conclusion
  • 13.
  • Digital Labour Keywords
  • 12.4.1.
  • Social Movements, the Internet and Social Media
  • 12.4.2.
  • The Occupy Movement and Social Media
  • 12.4.2.1.
  • Position 1 -- Technological Determinism: The Occupy Movement (and Other Rebellions) Are Internet Rebellions
  • 12.4.2.2.
  • Position 2 -- Social Constructivism: We Have Been Witnessing Social Rebellions and Social Revolutions, Where Social Media Have Had Minor Importance; Social Media Are No Relevant Factor in Rebellions
Control code
ocn843785416
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xv, 403 pages
Isbn
9780415716154
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Lccn
2013017800
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other control number
40023051162
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)843785416

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      41.501174 -81.69177499999999
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